WTO members made important decisions on agriculture at the WTO Ministerial Conference in Nairobi, Kenya, in 2015. These include the obligation to remove agricultural export subsidies, decisions on public storage for food security purposes, a special safeguard mechanism for developing countries and trade rules for cotton. the obligation to meet specific binding commitments in each of the following areas: market access; Domestic assistance Export competition and reach agreement on health and plant health issues; See news on agricultural negotiations See news on access to the cotton market relates to the removal of customs barriers by WTO members. The 1995 agricultural agreement consists of tariff reductions: export subsidies are the third pillar. The 1995 agricultural agreement required industrialized countries to reduce export subsidies by at least 36% (in value terms) or by 21% (by volume) over a six-year value. For developing countries, the agreement called for reductions of 24% (in value) and 14% (in volume) over ten years. WTO information on agriculture, including notifications from WTO members Video: how to use AGIMS and recalls that the aforementioned long-term objective is to allow a substantial gradual reduction in agricultural aid and land protection, which are maintained over an agreed period, the right to correct and prevent restrictions and distortions on world agricultural markets; While the volume of world agricultural exports has increased significantly in recent decades, its growth rate has remained below that of industrial enterprises, resulting in a steady decline in the share of agriculture in world merchandise trade. In 1998, agricultural trade accounted for 10.5% of total merchandise trade, taking into account trade in services, while agriculture`s share of world exports was 8.5%. However, in the field of world trade, agriculture still lays ahead of sectors such as mining products, automotive products, chemicals, textiles and clothing, or iron and steel. Among agricultural products marketed internationally, food accounts for almost 80% of the total.

The other main category of agricultural products is raw materials. Since the mid-1980s, trade in processed agricultural products and other quality agricultural products has grown much faster than trade in staple foodstuffs, such as cereals. In principle, agriculture is subject to all WTO agreements and agreements on trade in goods, including the 1994 GATT agreements and WTO agreements on issues such as tariff assessment, import authorisation procedures, due diligence, emergency measures, subsidies and technical barriers to trade. However, in the event of a conflict between these agreements and the agricultural agreement, the provisions of the agreement on agriculture apply. WTO agreements on trade in services and trade aspects of intellectual property rights also apply to agriculture. The agreement has been criticized by NGOs that categorize subsidies into trade-distorting national subsidies (the «amber box») that need to be reduced, not trade-distorting subsidies (blue and green boxes) that can escape discipline and therefore be increased. While efficient agricultural exporters are pushing WTO members to reduce their support for the «amber box» and the «blue box» that distorts trade, green box spending in industrialized countries has increased. At the WTO Ministerial Conference in Bali, Indonesia, in 2013, ministers also agreed on a range of agriculture-related issues.