What options do you have if you don`t have a written lease? Does your landlord have the freedom to change the terms of your tenancy agreement, including rent, at any time? While many landlords and tenants would never dream of being associated with a lease without a well-developed written lease, the question often arises as to whether a lease can be entered into or not, even a verbal agreement. It may be difficult to imagine many situations in which a landlord and tenant would find it in their long-term interest to enter into a lease without solidifying the conditions in writing, oral agreements can be considered legally binding in California, provided they meet certain conditions. I fired the mother-in-law for whom I paid my rent. The owners knew I would stay and I would pay for rent (at MIL), Internet (directly), food and other bills since I moved in 7 months ago. She told me I had two days to move, which is if I get paid until I get paid. Is that legal? I am pretty sure I have the right to notice 30 days because the owners have agreed to let me verbally pass the lease. Oral agreements can be difficult to enforce, as there is often no evidence of what has been agreed. For example, there may be a particular problem that was not covered by the agreement. As with written agreements, oral agreements offer certain rights to the landlord and tenant, but the difference is that they may be more difficult to enforce. If a dispute were to be tried, there would be no written lease as evidence, so that one of the parties would not be able to obtain the rights which, in its view, were entered into verbally at the beginning of the lease. My son did not sign an agreement with the owner, only verbally. The owner now sells property, and calls us the night before to say that someone sees the property the next day. My son works, so I have to do it because he can`t afford to take a break.

The owner came yesterday with a friend and another real estate agent, but he told us it was a visit. He told me today that someone will see tomorrow. It`s not fair that it continues to do so, I can give some advice please the only oral rental contracts as legally binding in the state of California are those that last less than a year.